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The British parliament is set to hold a debate on Brexit on February 14 but with just 45 days until Britain leaves the bloc, no date has yet been set for another "meaningful" vote on May's deal.

He said: "The Prime Minister has been telling everybody, including thousands and thousands of Conservative councillors, that she is determined to leave whatever happens on March 29".

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney said Tuesday that United Kingdom investment had not grown since the 2016 European Union membership referendum, and has "dramatically underperformed both history and peers".

Mrs May told him that she would ask MPs to suspend the usual requirement for a delay of 21 working days before an worldwide treaty is approved by Parliament.

But Robbins, the most senior civil servant involved in the Brexit process, was overheard by a reporter from ITV, holding a late-night conversation in which he appeared to suggest she would wait until March - and then give MPs the choice between backing her, or accepting a long extension to article 50. As the United Kingdom barrels towards a no-deal (there are seriously only *45 days* until we are due to leave the EU), the prime minister once again tried to reassure us that nothing has changed.

She confirmed that she will table an amendable motion for debate on Thursday, seeking the House's continued support for her to demand "alternative arrangements" to keep the border open after Brexit.

Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond canceled a planned trip to China next week to deal with the Brexit situation at home, a Treasury spokeswoman said.

In a statement to parliament to update lawmakers on her negotiations with the European Union to secure changes to the Brexit deal, May said she wanted lawmakers from all parties to back the Brexit deal she is aiming to strike, citing the need to pass further legislation to prepare for Britain's exit from the EU.

Mrs May pledged to return to Parliament on February 26, if no deal has been secured before that time, to report back on progress and trigger a further MPs' vote the following day. It is that promise that led to this week's vote.

"This time that remains is extremely short", he added.

But May responded: "In most circumstances, that period may be important in order for this House to have an opportunity to study that agreement".

"By getting the changes we need to the backstop; by protecting and enhancing workers' rights and environmental protections; and by enhancing the role of parliament in the next phase of negotiations I believe we can reach a deal that this house can support".

Media captionConfused by Brexit jargon?

"And I set out the UK's position, strengthened by the mandate that this house gave me, that this house needs to see legally binding changes to the backstop, and that can be achieved by changes to the withdrawal agreement". "The risks to jobs, the NHS and security from No Deal are too great for us to stand back and let the Government drift", Cooper said.

Among the suggestions is an amendment from Labour MP Richard Godsiff, calling for a second referendum if May is not able to come to a deal backed by parliament.

Early on Tuesday morning, Commons leader Andrea Leadsom did not exactly quash that notion in an interview with the Today programme.

The EU is not planning to offer May the concessions she has asked for.

The Prime Minister, the Chancellor and the Business Secretary will be hearing the same warnings as I am - that several more large manufacturers, household names employing tens of thousands of people, are poised to follow in Nissan's footsteps.

The comments by Mr Robbins - a key figure in the negotiations with the European Union - will fuel the suspicion among MPs that Mrs May is trying to "run down the clock" to Brexit day on March 29 in an attempt to force them to back her agreement.

As uncertainty around Brexit grows, a study by the IWH Institute in Germany revealed that if Britain leaves the European Union without a deal, it would put almost 6 lakh people around the world out of jobs.


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